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Read in 2021

So these are all the books I’ve read so far in 2021, whether I ended up reviewing them or not!

  • The Orchard of Lost Souls – Nadifa Mohammed (19 Dec 2020–3 Jan 2021)
    ★★★½ Historical fiction following three women/girls from very different walks of life during Somalia’s descent into civil war. Full review »

  • The Burning God (The Poppy War #3) – R.F. Kuang (4–11 Jan 2021)
    ★★★ Fang Runin calls on the phoenix to help her defeat the warlords, the Hesperians, and the regime of her former classmate Nezha. Full review »

  • All Systems Red (The Murderbot Diaries #1) – Martha Wells (11–14 Jan 2021)
    ★★★★ In a far future dominated by corporations, one SecUnit – part organic, part machine – has hacked its governor unit to achieve autonomy, which it mostly uses to watch soap operas and slack off on work. Full review »

  • Amnesty (The Amberlough Dossier #3) – Lara Elena Donnelly (17–20 Jan 2021)
    ★★★★ Amberlough is now run-down and changed after years of Ospie rule. While the population clamours for collaborators like Cyril to be sent to the gallows, Lillian and Aristide launch separate schemes to try to keep him with his life. Full review »

  • The Weight of the Sunrise – Vylar Kaftan (28 Jan 2021)
    ★★★★ An alt-history where the Inca Empire rebounded after an initial deadly outbreak of smallpox and continued into the 18th century. They encounter Americans offering a vaccine. More thoughts »

  • A Closed and Common Orbit (Wayfarers #2) – Becky Chambers (6–14 Feb 2021)
    ★★★★★ An emotional space opera following a talented tech who was raised by an AI, and an AI now dealing with life in an artificial body. Full review »

  • The Fifth Season (The Broken Earth #1) – N.K. Jemisin (16–19 Feb 2021)
    ★★★★★ The first part of an epic fantasy trilogy, set during the beginning of the end of the world. Full review »

  • Break the Dark (The Rubicon Saga #3) – Cheryl Lawson (20–25 Feb 2021)
    ★★ Finale to a science fiction trilogy following the plight of a beleaguered human settlement on Mars. Full review »