In the near future, I’d like to have templates in place on my blog, so I can post proper bookmarks (and replies and likes!) and have those sent out as Webmentions to sites that support that standard. I haven’t done so yet though, so in the meantime, here are some links to things I’ve read in the last week or so that I found interesting and worth sharing ๐Ÿ™‚

  • We Keep You Alive: Unskilled Labour Does Not Exist by Lizzie O’Shea. This is an article from last year, but it’s a great one about the delusion of “unskilled labour”, and how this serves as an ideological construct to justify the low pay and overbearing/tyrannical management of workers in industries like retail, hospitality, warehousing and transport.
  • Long Covid: We’ve Been Here Before is an article on the British Medical Association website, talking about how chronic fatigue syndrome has for so long been dealt with so badly, with some doctors thinking of it as a psychosomatic condition best treated by telling sufferers to suck it up and just start exercising or whatever. Now that “Long Covid” (aka CFS caused specifically by Covid-19) is a concern, suddenly attention is being given to the illness.
  • An ABC News article on how little streaming revenue goes to artists if they’re signed with major record labels โ€“ I have more thoughts on this topic, but for now I’ll say that to me, this demonstrates that indie business models are so much better for artists under capitalism (even if a post-capitalist society would be better for artists again) and as consumers, where we can, we should try to support them ๐Ÿ™‚
  • The rise and rise of Barangaroo: an oldie (2015) but a goodie. Talks about all the corruption and corporate interests behind the development of the Barangaroo precinct in Sydney. And, while no one needed any more reasons to hate Paul Keating, this article gives you them anyway ๐Ÿ˜
  • They’ve left South Asia, but can’t escape the discrimination and division of its caste system: so, my partner’s family is diaspora Indian, but none of this rubbish happens with them (even the most conservative members). I found it shocking and deeply depressing to see that this kind of cruelty is happening even in the diaspora in Australia.
  • Mastodon really is crumbling โ€“ and it’ll only get worse: I wouldn’t say I co-sign every single point of this article or anything, but I have noticed some of the tendencies it talks about and it makes me worry for the future of the fediverse (seeing as Mastodon is the best-known and most widespread example of it) too.
  • The ALP: How to Be Progressive Again: sadly I don’t think the ALP will follow any of the advice herein, but if they actually wanted to return to the “glory days” when they were a progressive force to be reckoned with (not that they were ever perfect as such) they would.
  • My family’s reckoning by Ellen Fanning (ABC News). So look, the ending of this article is very twee and eyebrow-raising, but before that point this article gives a good overview to the extent of institutionalised slavery in Queensland, written by a woman whose family/ancestors profited from that exploitation.
  • In “Work Won’t Love You Back”, Sarah Jaffe Kills the Dream Job: review of a book I desperately need ๐Ÿ˜ญ
  • Disqus, the dark commenting system: “surveillance capitalism” at its starkestโ€ฆ Disqus even loads malware into visitors' browsers! ๐Ÿ˜ฑ
  • What the Far-Right Fascination with Pinochet’s Death Squads Should Tells Us: that far right “libertarians” are ghouls, mainly
  • Denial is the Heartbeat of America: about how the most American thing at all is the constant use of the label “un-American” to describe things that America is very well-known for
  • Solve the Climate Crisis: Abolish the Rich: A key quote from this: If that 10 percent of high emitters reduce their carbon footprint … to the level of the average European citizen, that would be equivalent of a one-third cut in global emissions, even if the other 90 percent did nothing.